Tagged with French food

How To Make Beurre Noisette (Brown Butter)

How To Make Beurre Noisette (Brown Butter)

Beurre noisette, literally hazelnut butter, is often used in French cooking and baking, and it is therefore good to know how to make it. The hazelnut doesn’t only refer to the color, but also to the nutty smell and taste of butter that has been treated this way. It can be used as a sauce … Continue reading

Monkfish à l’Américaine (Lotte à l’Armoricaine)

Monkfish à l’Américaine (Lotte à l’Armoricaine)

I don’t prepare enough classic French dishes, but luckily Nadia of Maison Travers keeps posting recipes to inspire me to cook more of them. In this case monkfish with Américaine sauce. This sauce, originally named Armoricaine, doesn’t have anything to do with America but has instead been named after Armorica, the ancient name for the … Continue reading

Boeuf Bourguignon Sous-Vide

Boeuf Bourguignon Sous-Vide

Boeuf Bourguignon is a famous beef stew from the French region of Burgundy. The beef is stewed with red wine and served with mushrooms and pearl onions in a rich beefy sauce. I’ve posted before how to make it on the stovetop or using a pressure cooker. It is delicious, if you succeed in stewing the beef … Continue reading

Blanquette de Veau Sous-Vide (Creamy Veal Stew)

Blanquette de Veau Sous-Vide (Creamy Veal Stew)

Blanquette de veau is a classic French dish that I was reminded of by Nadia. Visit her wonderful blog for a classic recipe. I’ve prepared a sous-vide version that turned out delicious. Blanc is French for white, and so everything but the parsley in this recipe is ‘white’: veal, mushrooms, pearl onions, white sauce, and … Continue reading

Homemade Brioche Bread

Homemade Brioche Bread

Brioche is white bread enriched with eggs and butter, and thus perfect for the holidays. In this case I made one big loaf, but you can also make smaller loaves or buns. For the characteristic shiny top, braze the top with egg yolk after baking (when still hot). If you’re serious enough about baking to … Continue reading

Vichyssoise (Cold Potato & Leek Soup)

Vichyssoise (Cold Potato & Leek Soup)

Stéphane of MyFrenchHeaven.com wrote so enthusiastically about Vichyssoise, which is a cold potato and leek soup, that I wanted to give it a try. I prepared it according to his recipe, and the result was a very elegant refreshing soup. The best recipes are usually the simple ones with only a few ingredients, and this … Continue reading

Bouillabaisse

Bouillabaisse

Bouillabaisse is a classic fish soup from Marseille in France. The name comes from boiling (bouilla) over low (baisse) heat. Originally it was made from fish that fishermen had left over. Now there are so many versions that a group of restaurants in Marseille has published a charter to define what bouillabaisse should be. According … Continue reading

Crème Brûlée

Crème Brûlée

Crème Brûlée is one of the best known and most delicious of French desserts. I used to make it often about a decade ago, long before I started blogging. Back then I made it so often that I got tired of it. But now I was reminded by a friend who asked for the recipe. … Continue reading

Traditional French Onion Soup

Traditional French Onion Soup

For this traditional French onion soup, I used the recipe of fellow blogger Stéphane of My French Heaven. Because I wholeheartedly agree with him that onion soup should be made from… onions! Of course we want to top it with a nice slice of toasted baguette with melted French cheese, but the ingredients of the … Continue reading

Easy Foolproof Béarnaise Sauce

Easy Foolproof Béarnaise Sauce

Béarnaise is one of the classic sauces from French cuisine and it is great with steak. The traditional way of preparing it au bain marie requires quite a bit of skill, as the sauces curdles easily. It also requires you to make clarified butter first. And even though you should make clarified butter to cook the steak … Continue reading

Clafoutis

Clafoutis

Clafoutis is a flan-type cake from France, usually stuffed with cherries. I’ve stayed very close to the recipe of Stéphane’s great grandmother, which he posted on his wonderful blog My French Heaven. It is quite easy to make and it was delicious. According to the traditional recipe, you are not supposed to pit the cherries … Continue reading

Tarte Tatin

Tarte Tatin

One of the most famous French tarts is the upside-down apple tart that according to legend was created by mistake by the Tatin sisters in the 1880s. Baking the cake upside-down helps to keep the crust crispy. The other success factor is the combination of apples with caramel. It sure is delicious and not that … Continue reading

Tian Provençal

Tian Provençal

When I saw Richard McGary’s vegetable tian, I knew I’d prepare one too. A tian is actually named after the traditional earthenware dish they are made in. There are vegetable tians, meat tians, and fish tians. I wanted to prepare a tian as a side dish, and so I chose a very traditional tian provençal … Continue reading

Jambon Persillé (Ham Hock Terrine)

Jambon Persillé (Ham Hock Terrine)

Burgundy (Bourgogne) is a region in France that is famous for its wine and its food. Three years ago we went there for a few days to discover the wine region and purchased some nice wines. When tasting white wines, often a appetizer called jambon persillé was served with it and I remember it was … Continue reading

Pressure-Cooked Boeuf Bourguignon

Pressure-Cooked Boeuf Bourguignon

Although I purchased my pressure cooker for making stocks, I thought it would be nice to try making a pressure-cooked stew as well. Pressure cookers are known as “fast cookers” (or actually “fast cooking pan”, “snelkookpan”) in Dutch, and in this case it is true because stewing beef in a pressure cooker only takes 20 … Continue reading

Coq au Vin Sous-Vide

Coq au Vin Sous-Vide

Coq au Vin was ‘invented’ to turn a tough old rooster into a feast. Nowadays it is hard to find such tough old roosters, and most Coq au Vin is made with chickens that have only lived to be about six weeks old. They do not really require to be simmered for a long time … Continue reading

Coq au Vin

Coq au Vin

Coq au Vin is a prime example of classic French cooking. It is a lot of work, but worth it. “Coq” is French for rooster, and in times when people still ate roosters they were old and thus so tough that they needed to be stewed in wine to make them edible. Nowadays most chicken … Continue reading

Quiche Lorraine (Quiche Alsacienne)

A quiche is a savory pie with a custard-based filling. Lorraine is a region in north-east France that has mixed German-French history and is called Lothringen in German. The word “quiche” comes from German “Küchen” (pie). According to wikipedia there are three types of quiche: Lorraine: with bacon (lardons) only, Vosgienne: with bacon and cheese, and Alsacienne: with bacon, … Continue reading

Sole Meunière

The best way to prepare really fresh sole is to simply fry it in butter. In French this is called Sole Meunière. Of course it is much easier to fry the sole perfectly in clarified butter than in regular butter, so I decided to celebrate my first batch of clarified butter by making sole meunière. … Continue reading

Boeuf Bourguignon à la Conor

I had not made Boeuf Bourguignon in a long time, but was inspired by Conor’s post to make it again. As Conor rightly points out, there is no such thing as an official recipe for Boeuf Bourguignon. The only mandatory ingredients are beef (boeuf is indeed French for beef…) and red Burgundy wine. Conor’s recipe … Continue reading