Tagged with Modernist Cuisine

Understanding Food Safety

Understanding Food Safety

After the trilogy of posts about understanding what happens to meat when you cook it in terms of juiciness, tenderness, succulence, flavor, and appearance, another important subject to cover is food safety. This post does not just apply to meat, but also to other animal-based foods such as seafood, and plant-based foods such as vegetables. … Continue reading

Modernist Cuisine Shrimp Cocktail

Modernist Cuisine Shrimp Cocktail

In the same session as Modernist Cuisine Pulpo a la Gallega, we also prepared the Shrimp Cocktail from the Plated Dishes volume of Modernist Cuisine. This preparation is quite a contrast with the traditional Avocado and Shrimp Cocktail I blogged about a few days ago. It looks very pretty and is a lot of work. … Continue reading

Modernist Cuisine Pulpo a la Gallega

Modernist Cuisine Pulpo a la Gallega

“Modernist Cuisine” is an amazing set of books by Nathan Myhrvold and a team. It was supposed to be a single book on sous-vide cooking, but things got a little out of hand and it ended up being a 5-volume standard textbook on a modernist approach to cooking. It actually also covers traditional cooking techniques. … Continue reading

Brown Beef Stock

Brown Beef Stock

Home-made stock is an important success factor to many dishes and sauces. It is vastly superior to bouillon cubes and in most cases also better than anything else you can buy in a store. It’s not hard to make — it just takes a bit of time. After the success of pressure-cooked chicken stock I am … Continue reading

Duck Leg Confit Sous-Vide

Duck Leg Confit Sous-Vide

Unlike duck breast, duck legs are tough and need low & slow cooking to make them tender. Confit is a traditional French preparation to cook the legs low and slow in duck fat to make them tender as well as preserve them. To make duck leg confit the traditional way, you need quite a bit … Continue reading

Monkfish sous-vide temperature experiment

Monkfish sous-vide temperature experiment

Recently we had really good monkfish at Librije***. According to the recipe published by Jonnie Boer, the chef, it had been cooked sous-vide at 52C/125F for 12 minutes. This surprised me a little, since Joan Roca, Modernist Cuisine and Jason Logsdon all prescribe 48C/118F. Google showed that 62C/144F is also a popular temperature in blogs. … Continue reading

Dashi sous-vide

Dashi, a stock from kombu seaweed and bonito flakes, is as essential to Japanese cooking. It is used as a basic ingredient in so many dishes that it has a big influence on the taste of a Japanese meal. It is used in many soups or sauces, including miso soup and tempura sauce. Kikunoi is … Continue reading

Classic Ossobuco alla Milanese sous-vide

Ossobuco is a classic Italian dish from Milan that most people know as veal shanks braised in tomato sauce. Originally, the veal shanks were actually braised in veal stock with just a hint of tomato. I like this classic version, because it gives a meatier flavor. With sous-vide cooking, you could braise the veal shanks … Continue reading

Pork Belly sous-vide

Next to beef short ribs, pork belly is a meat that is often mentioned on eGullet as a favorite for sous-vide. I usually don’t eat pork belly, but I thought I’d give it a try and was not disappointed! Modernist Cuisine gives 60C/140F and 65C/149F, both for 72 hours, as ‘best bets’ for pork belly … Continue reading

Best temperature for Beef Short Ribs sous-vide

Welcome to Stefan’s Gourmet Blog!  You can find an overview of my sous-vide recipes as well as times and temperatures by clicking on “Sous-Vide” above.  If you like what you see here, you can sign up on the sidebar to receive an email whenever I post a new recipe. I’ve only known about sous-vide cooking … Continue reading

Lobster sous-vide temperature experiment

Lobster sous-vide temperature experiment

Welcome to Stefan’s Gourmet Blog!  You can find an overview of my sous-vide recipes as well as times and temperatures by clicking on “Sous-Vide” above.  If you like what you see here, you can sign up on the sidebar to receive an email whenever I post a new recipe. It’s lobster season in the Netherlands … Continue reading

Pork shoulder sous-vide

I’ve made pork shoulder sous-vide before, and that was pretty good in a tender medium-rare style (cooked at 55C/131F for 48 hours). This time I wanted a “braised” texture, and so tried 36 hours at 65C/149F as advised in Modernist Cuisine. It came out very nice: juicy and so tender you could eat it with … Continue reading

Hyperdecanting wine à la “Modernist Cuisine”

There are two reasons for decanting wine: separating the sediment from the wine (only needed for all wines that have sediment in the bottle, usually older wines) and letting the wine ‘breathe’ (oxygenation and outgassing; this may improve most wines but especially young red wines of which the tannins haven’t yet softened). Dutch wine connoisseurs … Continue reading