Fresh Pomegranate Juice

I’ve never really liked pomegranate juice because I always thought it was too astringent. Boy was I wrong! I had just never tasted fresh pomegranate juice before. Just like with orange juice, there is a huge difference between the real thing (i.e. freshly squeezed) and store-bought stuff. A post on REMCooks.com inspired me to try making my own pomegranate juice, and I absolutely loved it. Thanks, Richard! Fresh pomegranate juice is as different from store-bought pomegranate juice as freshly squeezed orange juice is different from orange juice from concentrate. Fresh pomegranate juice is sweeter, less astringent, and has a wonderful flavor. It also is very healthy.

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There is just one drawback — it is a bit of work to make it. It is also a bit messy to get the arils out, so I advise you to wear an apron. It is also not very cheap, as you get about half a glass of juice from a single pomegranate (and they are about a euro each around here). Here’s how to make the juice yourself.

Note added on December 6, 2013: there is a better way to get the arils out of a pomegranate!

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For a nice big glass of pomegranate juice, take two pomegranates. Nothing else. 100% natural.

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Cut them open and remove the arils with your fingers. This is the splashy part. After I had finished, there was juice just about everywhere. (For removing the final pieces of white stuff, it helps to put the arils in water. The arils will sink while the white stuff will float, so you can remove it more easily.)

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Put the arils into the bowl of your food processor or blender…

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…and blend until smooth.

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Pour the blended arils into a fine sieve…

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…and press down with a spoon to get as much juice out as possible.

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That’s all — enjoy the juice!

If you own a juicer or better yet a slow juicer, that would be a better way to make the juice. Especially a slow juicer, as that will oxidize the juice less.

Flashback

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Two years ago, I posted about home made fresh ravioli stuffed with witlof/chicory/belgian endive and gorgonzola — a wonderful combination.

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36 thoughts on “Fresh Pomegranate Juice

  1. I just made this a few weeks ago, would have to agree with the messy part, I made a mess, my sink looked like a crime scene, then I went online and read about way to deal with it, and there’s actually a couple of methods out that are way way cleaner, and requires tapping the pomegranate with a wooden spoon 🙂

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  2. Pomegranate is one of Vinny’s favorite foods (http://cookupastory.wordpress.com/2013/07/09/pomegranate-goddess-of-love/). But I’ve never tried making the juice your way. I have a fruit in my kitchen as we speak and will try it out tomorrow. If you read this post, there is another one that follows with more ways to use the fruit. It’s unlikely that Vinny can teach you anything, Stefan, but they might at least entertain you for a minute 🙂 – S

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      1. I find blogs a wonderful source of inspiration, too! What I love about yours are the nice presentations and your “from scratch” approach, not to mention the expertise you offer. I just felt a bit presumptuous referring you to Vinny’s kid-friendly recipes. Anyway, I whizzed the aryls in my food processor today and for the first time ever made some fresh pomegranate juice. I loved it… and so did my little 1.5 year old granddaughter!

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  3. Hi, Stefan,
    I love pomegranate – the taste is great, plus they are so salubrious. What a great idea to juice it using a food processor and sive! This would be very nice in a cocktail… though that might detract from the health benefits (HA). The color really pops – it is vibrant.
    Nice share!
    Best,
    Shanna

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        1. I don’t know many cocktails, but I do remember this one as it was the first alcoholic drink I’ve ever had in the US. I was hardly drinking back then, but since I had to go through the trouble to get carded (I was 21) and I was getting strange looks when I ordered ‘straight’ OJ, I figured what the hell, and ordered a Sex on the beach. It was nice 🙂

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            1. I still have an affinity for the first red wine that I really liked (barolo) and the first white that I really liked (pouilly-fumé). Interesting how a few sips can have such a big effect.

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              1. Stefan – I agree. I do remember your post on barolo, and I remember that you have mentioned pouilly-fumé a few times on your blog. I have tried it a few times and it is very smooth and rich. Yes, our first wines have a lasting effect, like some foods. What created your love for Italian food? Your passion is clear. Best regards – Shanna

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                1. My dad lived in Italy for 15 months about 8-9 years before I was born. The superiority of Italian food has always been a given for me 🙂 It helps that I like it a lot too, though. Just like Japanese food, but that is a lot harder to master as I don’t speak the language nor have visited it often. Italy is only a 2 hour flight or a 10-12 hour drive from here.

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  4. Paul is right. -cut the pomegranate through its equator, -place a wide bowl in the kitchen sink, -hold the half, seed-side facing down in your palm with your fingers seperated over the bowl, -protecting your fingers, tap on the skin hard with heavy wooden spoon, -seeds will fall out in seconds. 😀

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  5. Must be delicious!!! I love pomegranates but I have never tried the juice. I’ll buy some next time I go to the grocery store. I must have a glass of that nectar of the gods! 🙂

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  6. I could very easily have penned your opening statement, Stefan. I’ve never much cared for bottled pomegranate juice. Now, though, you’ve convinced me to give it another try. Yes, I envision quite a mess by the time I’m sipping juice. I just have to remember to wear black in the kitchen that day. 🙂

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